A Travellerspoint blog

Day in the life of Makaphutu

Bonus Blog for TWOWEEKS volunteers

5.45am The children are up and doing chores (whilst singing loudly, more effective than any alarm clock) before breakfast.

6am Any one who has a hospital appointment leaves early- government clinics in South Africa have a first come first served 'system' and it's not uncommon for those seen later in the day to be told the medication they need has already run out.

7am The minibus taking nearly 20 of the primary school children departs for Lily Vale School (blaring this to much excitement) as does another minibus and car dropping off children who attend other schools in the area. Most attend English speaking schools whilst a couple attend Zulu schools.
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8am The youngest children all spend the day in the same cottage doing nursery activities and playing in the ominously named (but actually lovely) 'Pen'. The 'Dokatelas' head off to 1000 Hills clinic, Don Mackenzie TB Hospital or to work on personal projects.
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1.30pm Primary schools finish and the children are ferried back to Makaphutu. Most get straight on the trampoline.
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4pm Most of the children are back and homework club starts in Cottage 6 (a recreational area with TV, first aid room, library and sewing room). The volunteers supervise and turn their hands to everything from Life Skills to advanced trigonometry, although the older children are always disappointed to learn we have not a clue about their Afrikaans homework.

7pm Wednesday is Community Meeting night led by Nic, the village CEO and guardian. There are announcements, talks, prayers and a lot of beautiful Zulu singing.

10pm On a school night even the teenagers are expected to be in bed. Given how exhausted we are, so are the volunteers.
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Posted by arianemeena 14:00 Archived in South Africa

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